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Eating Broiled or Baked Fish Helps the Heart

It has been common knowledge for quite some time that eating fish is healthy for you, especially for your heart. A new study, published in the May 24 edition of the AHA journal Circulation: Heart Failure, has revealed that there is much more to this however, since it reveals that how you prepare the fish can change the way it affects your health.

The study followed 84,493 postmenopausal women aged 50 – 79 from the Women’s Health Initiative Study over an average of 10 years and found that if they ate at least 5 servings of baked or broiled fish a week, they would have 30% less risk to develop heart failure.

WHAT IF IT’S FRIED?

Interestingly enough, though, the study also revealed that if the fish was fried, it would actually become rather unhealthy for you. Eating just 1 serving of fried fish a week was linked to a 48% higher risk of developing heart failure. Donald Lloyd-Jones, M.D., the chair of preventive medicine at the Northwestern University Feinberg, in Evanston, Illinois, says that “How you prepare the fish is just as, if not more, important than the type of fish in terms of seeing benefits.”

THE TYPE OF FISH IS STILL IMPORTANT, THOUGH

The study also notes that some types of fish appear to be healthier for you than others. Consuming dark and oily fish such as salmon, mackerel, bluefish was associated with a lower risk of heart failure, but tuna fish or white fish such as sole, snapper or cod was not.

Dark fish may contribute to a healthier heart because of their high content of Omega-3 fatty acids. Atlantic salmon, for example, contains roughly 3-6 times as much Omega-3’s as cod or sole.

However, the study also estimated each participant’s total Omega-3 intake and found little to no connection between Omega-3’s and the reduced risk of heart failure. This could mean that it’s the whole fish, and not just one of its parts, that aids in a healthier heart. Lloyd-Jones adds that “pills just don’t have the same benefits. It’s a mistake to think that we know all the benefits of fish, and clearly not all of those  benefits come from Omega-3’s”.

[box type=”important”]The American Heart Association recommends eating at least two 3.5 ounce servings of fish, particularly fatty fish, per week.[/box]

SOURCES:

Hello, I'm Noel Blanco and I write Fitness Philippines. I have been involved in physical fitness for more than 10 years now and am currently taking up graduate studies on Exercise and Sports Science at the University of the Philippines.

3 Comments

  1. Ken Weiss

    July 4, 2011 at 12:56 am

    While baked or broiled fish is a heart healthy food, loaded with protein and omaga 3 fatty acids, what about blackened fish? I hear although this is a tasty way to prepare fish or chicken, nutritionists say blackened has health risks???

  2. Health Blog

    June 2, 2011 at 4:46 am

    Fish is always good for heart and health. fish contains lots of proteins and healthy lipids sch as omega-3 fatty acids and unsaturated fatty acids which are very good for heart.

  3. HERBCYCLOPEDIA

    May 30, 2011 at 2:19 pm

    Hi Noel, you did it again, nice article, one remark though about Omega 3, people tend to think that they can replace Omega 3 intake by just having supplement pills, but excess of Omega 3 will just be as bad as lack of it, so please take care with that.

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