Are Energy Drinks Bad for Your Teeth?

Sometimes you just need a boost of energy to get you through the day.  Energy drinks promise that extra boost and there is a broader selection of these drinks than ever before.  But because of the strength of acidity in these drinks some are wondering if the beverages are good for our teeth.

The main problem with energy drinks and our teeth really is the acidity levels.  It is this acidity that can wear away at the enamel on our teeth.  And once that enamel is worn away it makes it much easier for cavities to form and cause other serious problems.

Can’t you just use a special toothpaste or mouthwash to regrow enamel?  This is a common myth.  You cannot regrow enamel.  Once it is gone, it is gone for good.  This isn’t saying that you can’t keep enamel from getting worn down, but there is nothing in your body that will allow it to natural put enamel back once it has been worn away.

What makes energy drinks so dangerous to our mouths is how people drink them.  Most will sip on them slowly and drink several cans throughout the day.  This means that he acid has more time to sit on the teeth and begin to eat away at our precious enamel.  The worst thing you can do is to either drink several a day or drink one very slowly.  If you are going to have an energy drink you should drink the whole thing at once and be done with it.

If you drink the whole can at once you can then take a couple of moments to brush your teeth and rinse out your mouth to get that acid off your teeth.  Since this is the number once culprit in energy drinks and tooth decay you have to take of this first.

If you don’t have a toothbrush near you, you can just rinse your mouth out with some water to help get rid of most of the acid from the energy drink.

Another way to help protect your teeth from these drinks is to carry some sugar-free chewing gum with you.  When you chew your mouth forms saliva.  This saliva helps to regulate the PH of your mouth and will offset some of the acidity that exists.  You might not think gum can help combat the tooth decaying effects of energy drinks, but your saliva is more powerful than you might think.

While energy drinks are terrible for your teeth, if you absolutely must drink them you can take these precautions to help protect your teeth from getting cavities.  After all, once a cavity forms it can easily turn into the need for a root canal, and then we are talking about some major dentist bills.  Most dentists will tell you to avoid energy drinks or at least try not to drink them that often.  But if you brush right away it should not be a problem.  The problem is that most of us don’t exactly carry a toothbrush around with us.

Jon is a writer for a dentist in Shelby NC and also does research on many other oral health issues that are common today.  He also writes occasionally for a Gastonia dentist.

Contributing Author

This post was written by contributing author at Hive Health Media. If you would like to write for us about health, fitness, or blogging topics, click here.

9 thoughts on “Are Energy Drinks Bad for Your Teeth?

  • October 16, 2012 at 5:33 am
    Permalink

    This is not correct, the most important way to maintain oral health is to limit your intake of ANY food or drink to four or at most five times a day, this includes snacks and drinks. So as energy drinks are not taken at mealtimes and assuming most people eat meals three times a day. They are an enormous problem. Its the FREQUENCY of INTAKE that is the problem not what it is you are eating or drinking. If energy drinks were consumed with a meal no problem. Generally they are not. Energy drinks and bottled drinks are an enormous factor in the increase in tooth decay in the western world.

    Reply
  • October 16, 2012 at 2:10 am
    Permalink

    Whilst the general content of this post is good, there is one flaw ; it is not correct to brush after these drinks, it will cause more harm. You must wait for half an hour after drinking then brush or you will cause more erosion as you brush the acid into the tooths surface. After half an hour you have given your mouth some time to neutralise the acid itself , then brush.

    Reply
  • September 19, 2011 at 7:24 am
    Permalink

    I don’t think there are any health benefits to energy drinks! But one thing you could do for your teeth is switch to energy shots – that way you are only taking in maybe 2oz of acidic liquid, compared to a can that is probably 8-24oz.

    Reply
  • August 18, 2011 at 1:22 am
    Permalink

    Great and very informative post! Good point here: “What makes energy drinks so dangerous to our mouths is how people drink them. Most will sip on them slowly and drink several cans throughout the day. This means that he acid has more time to sit on the teeth and begin to eat away at our precious enamel.” Thanks for sharing this great info!

    Reply
  • August 16, 2011 at 11:31 pm
    Permalink

    Taurine Cysteine or any of the natural sulfur based
    amino acid group is shown to be the first line of
    defense in protecting gum and tooth from decay.
    Therefore please avoid fluoride or fluorine. Have a
    energy drink and enjoy life. Cheerio.

    Reply
  • August 16, 2011 at 11:04 pm
    Permalink

    My dentist suggested using a straw whenever I drank anything acidic. It’s a good tip, but replacing sugary drinks with plain water is one of the best things you can do for your teeth.

    Reply
  • August 15, 2011 at 6:51 am
    Permalink

    Thanks for this information. I must admit, I didn’t know much about the things you mentioned here. Now, I can practice better, boost up in one drink, and save my teeth. It sure pays to listen/read. Thanks!

    Reply
  • August 14, 2011 at 8:24 pm
    Permalink

    Great information.. now i will avoid energy drink to keep my teeth healthy..

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.